The Strategist

Yahoo to shut down Maps


06/06/2015 - 06:52





Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer
Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer
Yahoo plans to focus on its search business again. The technolcgy company will shut down its maps page as well as many other axillary sites.
 
The company has announced that it will continue to leverage its expertise in the search business, communication tools and content. The Maps page will be shut down by the end of this month while some other sites including Yahoo Music in Canada and France, Yahoo Movies in Spain and Yahoo Autos in the UK Yahoo’s main Philippines page will also be closed.
 
The company has been struggling to get its revenue up despite a hefty investment from China-based e retailing company Alibaba. Streamlining with a sense of purpose is the company’s next big move to make money in the business. "Part of that focus includes taking a hard look at our existing products and services, and ensuring our resources are spent smartly and with a clear purpose," the company’s blog post announcing the closure of Maps noted. Yahoo also announced that Maps will be supported in products such as search and Flickr. Major reason for Yahoo’s lackluster Maps launch is its rival Google’s unparalleled popularity. Even Apple with its exclusive Maps has been struggling till late to beat Google in the mapping service segment.
 
The company will shut Yahoo Music in France and Canada along with Yahoo Movies in Spain. Yahoo TV in Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and Canada as well as Yahoo Autos in most of those countries will be shut by the end of June. Meanwhile, it will expand its online offerings, launching18 new video series and courting Music content more ardently. The company will extend a deal with Live Nation to broadcast music festivals, and plans to join iHeartMedia to broadcast other music events.
 
Even as revenue is not picking up for the company, Yahoo has been sitting on a reserve money pileup which was bolstered by its investment in Alibaba in 2005 for $1 billion which now has a value of $30 billion.